Modular, label-free probe allows for highly selective detection of genetic variants, bacteria, and viruses
Modular, label-free probe allows for highly selective detection of genetic variants, bacteria, and viruses
Label-free probe can be utilized at room temperature for rapid detection of SNP differentiation. SNPs and RNA/DNA fragments provide a highly specific target for the detection of certain genetic variations and viral and bacterial disease markers. Conventional technologies use expensive fluorescently labeled TaqMan and molecular beacon (MB) probes.
New York, NY, United States
Overview Comments Tagged publications

Background 

The ability to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA and RNA sequences has broad implications in genomic studies and disease diagnosis. A convenient detection method for specific nucleic acid sequences, therefore, is important in the detection of bacteria and viruses, SNPs leading to genetically defined outcomes, and in the development of increasingly patient-centric pharmaceuticals. Current methods for detection of these sequences are expensive, as well as labor intensive and time consuming. An ideal approach provides a straightforward, inexpensive, and disposable detection format. The technology suite described here provides methodologies for room temperature detection of specific nucleic acid sequences via a modular, label-free probe. The probe changes the assay solution’s color only in the presence of the exact, targeted DNA sequence. As such, the technology suite provides a low cost, easy to use genetic variant detection platform that is quick (the reaction takes less than 30 minutes), can be done at room temperature, and can detect single nucleotide differences. Further, these methodologies may also allow for improved pharmaceutical development and the early detection of bacteria, viruses, and cancer. 

Label-free probe can be utilized at room temperature for rapid detection of SNP differentiation

SNPs and RNA/DNA fragments provide a highly specific target for the detection of certain genetic variations and viral and bacterial disease markers. Conventional technologies use expensive fluorescently labeled TaqMan and molecular beacon (MB) probes. Unlike current strategies, this technology can use unlabeled probes which are up to 40 times less expensive to synthesize. Compared to MB-based probes, this technology demonstrates higher hybridization selectivity at ambient temperatures and therefore more accurate disease diagnosis. In one variation, the technology provides a PCR-free fluorescent output that enables the detection of pathogenic bacteria at levels 1000 times lower than MB probes and other hybridization probes. In another variation, the technology allows rapid visualization of the presence of pathogenic bacteria via colorimetric change, making point of care determinations of disease possible via naked eye evaluation.

These technologies have been evaluated in a laboratory setting and have demonstrated highly reproducible and sensitive outcomes. 

Lead Inventor:

Dmitry Kolpashchikov, Ph.D.

Applications:

  • Improves existing molecular beacon technology in cost, accuracy, and versatility. 
  • RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme sensors improve detection sensitivity 
  • Peroxidase-based binary probe provides visual output for point of care (e.g., at-home or outpatient) diagnostics
  • Research and characterization of SNPs
  • Detection of SNPs and targeted pharmaceutical evaluation
  • Forensic nucleotide analysis
  • Diagnostic testing for viral and bacterial RNA/DNA

Advantages:

  • Can be used at room temperature
  • High selectivity to nucleotide sequences at ambient temperatures in all formats
  • Reduced costs of reagents
  • Does not require PCR amplification in some formats
  • Utilizes fluorescent signals to enhance decrease limits of detection
  • Visually detectable signal

Related Publications:

No comments.
No tagged publications.

Similar innovations

Back
or
Back
Back
or
Back
Back
or
Back
Back
or
Back
  • Rapid in vitro analysis of force strain in cell signaling pathways for use in tissue engineering
  • Facile method allows direct observation of effect of force with much higher throughput than other methods. Other methods to apply force to proteins, such as AFM or optical tweezers, are limited by the difficulty of setting up experiments and the time to complete an analysis. Additionally, these instruments are very expensive and difficult to operate and maintain. This method allows for multiple measurements to be conducted at the same time, greatly increasing the rate of experiments that can be conducted by a single researcher.
  • Read more
  • Methods
  • New York, NY, United States
  • Stanford University
← Previous Next → 1 2 3 4 Last
Showing 1-4 from 273

Send Us a Message